Educational/Pet Owner Tips

By Alan Green with Heather Graham

There are some things pet owners take for granted and never hear much about. A common comment concerns a pet’s nose being cool or warm and therefore there is or isn’t a concern depending on the temperature of the nose. That is another pet myth, uncovered this month by my outstanding colleague, Dr. Heather Graham. Dr. Graham is CVRCs board certified internal medicine specialist and sees and treats a myriad of complex conditions.

By Erin Stokes

For many dog owners that have experienced it, the word “bloat” can elicit images of terror. It is a common term for Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV) and it is an unfortunately frequent syndrome seen in our emergency hospital. This month I am pleased to introduce Dr. Erin Stokes, one of CVRC's highly trained emergency clinicians. Dr. Stokes describes the facts about GDV, its symptoms, treatments and methods of prevention.  

By David Sachs

Some of you may have noticed that the majority of our monthly information series has been targeted towards our canine loving audience. In the spirit of the New Year, we believed it was time to give a nod to our feline friends. After all, there are approximately 75 million pet cats in the United States.

This month my esteemed colleague, Dr. Peggy Sayer, discusses the topic of prevention and the importance of routine examinations for our feline friends. Dr. Sayer is a board-certified veterinary cardiologist at CVRC. Cats are prone to a significant amount of cardiac diseases and the benefits of early diagnosis and treatment are numerous. Here's to a healthy New Year!

By David Sachs

Holiday time is here again. The years seem to fly by. Depending on your frame of reference and your chosen profession, holidays mean different things to different folks. As veterinarians in a 24-hour emergency and specialty hospital, holidays bring an array of very predictable medical issues and emergencies.

It is my honor to introduce Dr. David Sachs, the co-owner of Charleston Veterinary Referral Center, as this month’s guest contributor. Dr. Sachs has spent years working as an emergency veterinarian and is the medical director of CVRC. He has written an informative article to raise awareness of the many issues surrounding pet ownership and the holidays.

By Jennifer Au, DVM, DACVS, CCRT

Hip dysplasia, and the osteoarthritis that comes with it, can be a potentially devastating disease for dogs. The good news is 70% of dogs with hip dysplasia do not need surgery if they are appropriately managed medically or conservatively. This is a combination of weight control, as-needed use of NSAIDs (under your veterinarian’s supervision), omega 3 fatty acids, joint supplements and low-impact activities such as walking and swimming. In addition, physical rehabilitation is a very useful and effective tool in the management of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis as well as weight loss.

This article recently appeared in the  Charleston Mercury written by Alan E. Green, DVM and Kristin Welch, DVM, DACVECC

Beware of snakes as warmer weather arrives in the Lowcountry. Our outdoor pets are vulnerable these days, and it’s not just hunting dogs that are in danger.

Dr. Kristin Welch, who helped with this article, is the head of Emergency and Critical Care at Charleston Veterinary Referral Center and the only board-certified critical-care specialist in South Carolina. She reminds us that of more than 120 species of snakes identified in the United States, 20 of them are venomous. Those that are poisonous in South Carolina include three species of rattlesnakes as well as cottonmouth water moccasins, copperheads and coral snakes.

Charleston, SC (August 28, 2012) — The ASPCA says 60% of all dogs over age 6 will get cancer during their lifetime, and Veterinary Pet Insurance says in 2011, they received nearly 50,000 claims for cancer diagnosis and treatment in pets – the No. 1 disease-related killer of dogs and cats. While these statistics may sound grim, there have been amazing advances in veterinary oncology during recent years. Treatments that were once only options for humans – such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy – are now available for our four-legged family members.

Dr. Rissetto and Skylar

Charleston, SC (August 9, 2012)  Living the quintessential Charleston lifestyle for many families and their pets includes beach time, boats and swimming.  The emergency team at CVRC sees cases of saltwater intoxication every summer, so Dr. Kristin Welch, head of our Emergency and Critical Care Department, wants to remind everyone about this danger to our pets.

Our ocean water has 3.5% dissolved salts, 90% of which is sodium chloride. That means for a typical Labrador Retriever, swallowing as little as 2-3 cups of saltwater could be toxic; less than 1 gallon of saltwater would be fatal. Once ingested, the salt is rapidly absorbed, resulting in symptoms within 30-60 minutes.

Charleston, SC (July 10, 2012) It’s summertime fun for you and your pet but do you know the top four pet emergencies to beware of this time of year? The region’s only Board Certified Critical Care Veterinary Specialist, Dr. Kristin Welch of Charleston Veterinary Referral Center (www.charlestonvrc.com) is sharing these tips to keep pets safe and educate pet owners this summer.

Charleston, SC  (February 29, 2012)  February is National Pet Dental Month and the dental care of dogs and cats is one of the most commonly overlooked areas of pet health care.   In fact, the American Veterinary Dental Society reports that 80% of dogs and 70% of cats show signs of oral disease by age three.   Charleston Veterinary Referral Center’s dentistry team, Heather L. Duncan, DVM and Katherine E. Queck, DVM, Fellow, Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, share the top pet dental conditions, symptoms, treatments and the top ten ways to keep your pet’s teeth healthy.

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