Educational/Pet Owner Tips

Charleston Veterinary Referral Center's Neurologist, Dr. Katherine Crook, was featured on The Pet Place Radio segment.  She was interviewed about an uncommon disease called Myasthenia Gravis, which affects both dogs and people causing musculoskeletal abnormalities.   Dr. Crook discussed the disease process including; clinical signs, breed predilections, diagnostics and treatments.  Also on the radio show were the pet parents of a dog named Joy, who suffered from this affliction and was diagnosed and treated by Dr. Crook.  Please take a listen to learn about this interesting disease process. 

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By Alan Green and Carly Conrad

A disease that is a true killer both in dogs and cats is one transmitted by mosquitoes. Here in the Lowcountry we have our fair share of these annoying and potentially deadly insects. It gives me great pleasure this month to introduce one of CVRC’s outstanding and highly skilled emergency doctors, Dr. Carly Conrad. Dr. Conrad has written an important and detailed piece on heartworm disease. I would urge all of the readers to educate yourselves on the disease and preventive measures you can take to protect your furry family members.

By Alan Green and Samantha Nelson

As pet owners, we often lovingly provide our furry friends a variety of treats and toys. As veterinarians, we often are faced with solving serious and often life threatening scenarios as a result of what our pets consume.

I am pleased to introduce the newest member of the CVRC Surgical Department, Dr. Samantha Nelson, DVM DACVS. Dr. Nelson gives us an important article on what you need to know about dietary indiscretion in our pets.

By Alan Green and Sean Ellison

For all of us, understanding and being knowledgeable of the environment we live in allows us to enjoy its beauty, while remaining respectful of the dangers. There is nothing more representative of this statement than the sago palm, a common and ubiquitous member of our surroundings in the Lowcountry. It is an honor this month to introduce Dr. Sean Ellison, DVM. Dr. Ellison is an important member of the CVRC Emergency and Critical Care team. He provides us important information about sago palm toxicity.

By Alan Green with Heather Graham

There are some things pet owners take for granted and never hear much about. A common comment concerns a pet’s nose being cool or warm and therefore there is or isn’t a concern depending on the temperature of the nose. That is another pet myth, uncovered this month by my outstanding colleague, Dr. Heather Graham. Dr. Graham is CVRCs board certified internal medicine specialist and sees and treats a myriad of complex conditions.

By Erin Stokes

For many dog owners that have experienced it, the word “bloat” can elicit images of terror. It is a common term for Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV) and it is an unfortunately frequent syndrome seen in our emergency hospital. This month I am pleased to introduce Dr. Erin Stokes, one of CVRC's highly trained emergency clinicians. Dr. Stokes describes the facts about GDV, its symptoms, treatments and methods of prevention.  

By David Sachs

Some of you may have noticed that the majority of our monthly information series has been targeted towards our canine loving audience. In the spirit of the New Year, we believed it was time to give a nod to our feline friends. After all, there are approximately 75 million pet cats in the United States.

This month my esteemed colleague, Dr. Peggy Sayer, discusses the topic of prevention and the importance of routine examinations for our feline friends. Dr. Sayer is a board-certified veterinary cardiologist at CVRC. Cats are prone to a significant amount of cardiac diseases and the benefits of early diagnosis and treatment are numerous. Here's to a healthy New Year!

By David Sachs

Holiday time is here again. The years seem to fly by. Depending on your frame of reference and your chosen profession, holidays mean different things to different folks. As veterinarians in a 24-hour emergency and specialty hospital, holidays bring an array of very predictable medical issues and emergencies.

It is my honor to introduce Dr. David Sachs, the co-owner of Charleston Veterinary Referral Center, as this month’s guest contributor. Dr. Sachs has spent years working as an emergency veterinarian and is the medical director of CVRC. He has written an informative article to raise awareness of the many issues surrounding pet ownership and the holidays.

By Jennifer Au, DVM, DACVS, CCRT

Hip dysplasia, and the osteoarthritis that comes with it, can be a potentially devastating disease for dogs. The good news is 70% of dogs with hip dysplasia do not need surgery if they are appropriately managed medically or conservatively. This is a combination of weight control, as-needed use of NSAIDs (under your veterinarian’s supervision), omega 3 fatty acids, joint supplements and low-impact activities such as walking and swimming. In addition, physical rehabilitation is a very useful and effective tool in the management of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis as well as weight loss.

This article recently appeared in the  Charleston Mercury written by Alan E. Green, DVM and Kristin Welch, DVM, DACVECC

Beware of snakes as warmer weather arrives in the Lowcountry. Our outdoor pets are vulnerable these days, and it’s not just hunting dogs that are in danger.

Dr. Kristin Welch, who helped with this article, is the head of Emergency and Critical Care at Charleston Veterinary Referral Center and the only board-certified critical-care specialist in South Carolina. She reminds us that of more than 120 species of snakes identified in the United States, 20 of them are venomous. Those that are poisonous in South Carolina include three species of rattlesnakes as well as cottonmouth water moccasins, copperheads and coral snakes.

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