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By Alan Green and Sean Ellison

For all of us, understanding and being knowledgeable of the environment we live in allows us to enjoy the beauty while being respectful of the dangers. There is nothing more representative of this statement than the sago palm, a common and ubiquitous member of our surroundings in the Lowcountry. It is an honor this month to introduce Dr. Sean Ellison. Dr. Ellison is an important member of the CVRC Emergency and Critical Care team. He provides us important information about sago palm toxicity.

By Alan Green and Sophy Jesty

There are many diseases that we have successfully created effective prevention for. One of the more devastating and common diseases, especially here in the Lowcountry is heartworm disease. This month, our esteemed colleague, CVRC board certified cardiologist Dr. Sophie Jesty, describes the disease, its transmission and methods of prevention.

By Alan Green and Rachel Seibert

This month’s case presentation is an example of why thorough and collaborative medical input is so important for successful outcomes. This month’s specialist contributor is Dr. Rachel Seibert. Dr. Seibert is one of CVRCs esteemed board certified surgical specialists. Along with Dr. Sophie Jesty, our board certified cardiologist, you will see how collaboration and expertise allowed this patient to have the best of medical outcomes, in spite of a very complicated and unusual presentation.

By Alan Green and Lisa Olsen

No matter where we live, it is important to understand the potential risks of that environment. As more and more people inhabit the Lowcountry, we must be aware of these risks to us and our pets. This month’s guest contributor is Dr. Lisa Olsen. Dr. Olsen is one of CVRC’s critical care specialists. Her topic is important to both pet owners and pets. Snakebites are extremely common. At CVRC we saw approximately 150 such incidents in 2016. Dr. Olsen does a great job at explaining this important and interesting subject. 

By Alan Green, Jennifer Au and Tracy Pejsa

There are many diseases seen in veterinary medicine that are not frequently discussed. In this edition, we see how profound an impact the combination of excellent diagnostics and expert rehabilitation capability can have on outcomes. Dr. Jennifer Au is CVRC’s lead surgeon and one of only a few board certified specialists in sports medicine and rehabilitation in the region. Tracy Pejsa is a licensed veterinary technician and certified in veterinary rehabilitation. Along with others on their team, they have made CVRCs departments of surgery and rehabilitation among the best in the country. They are this months guest authors.

By Alan Green and Lisa Olsen

It is interesting that different species metabolize substances in various ways. Sometimes, what is a treat in one species can be lethal in another. This is certainly the case for the artificial sweetener Xylitol. This month’s guest contributor is Dr. Lisa Olsen. Dr. Olsen, one of CVRC’s critical care specialists, writes about a very important topic in pets — xylitol poisoning.

By Gavin Olsen

“Preventive medicine,” a term that most people find synonymous with vaccination, involves much more. Of course, vaccination is a large aspect of preventive medicine, but physical examination, routine lab work and other types of disease prevention are included.

There are numerous vaccines on the market and not all are required. According to a joint publication by the American Veterinary Medical Association and American Animal Hospital Association, which groups vaccines according to whether they are core (or highly recommended) or non-core (considered elective, unless the diseases are endemic in the area), dogs should receive four core vaccines, while cats should receive between four and five.

By Helen Ravenel Hammond

When an emergency happens concerning your beloved pet, every minute counts. And sometimes there are needs that go well beyond what your veterinarian can do. That’s why there is Charleston Veterinary Referral Center (CVRC), the most advanced specialty and emergency
 small animal hospital in the Southeast. Patients are primarily injured and ill dogs and cats that are in dire circumstances.

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